Why Do You Contribute to Open Source?

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You probably remember my half-a-year-old article: Why Don't You Contribute to Open Source?. I said there that if you don't have your own OSS projects or don't give anything back to those you're using—something is wrong with you. Now I'm talking to those who actually do contribute without demanding anything back—guys, you're doing it wrong!

Any Program Has an Unlimited Number of Bugs

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This may sound strange, but I will prove it: no matter how big or stable a piece of software is, it has an unlimited number of bugs not yet found. No matter how many of them we have already managed to find and fix, there are still too many left to count.

Single Statement Unit Tests

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Many articles and books have already been written about unit testing patterns and anti-patterns. I want to add one more recommendation which, I believe, can help us make our tests, and our production code, more object-oriented. Here it is: a test method must contain nothing but a single assert.

Monikers Instead of Variables

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If we agree that all local variables must be final, multiple returns must be avoided, and temporal coupling between statements is evil—we can get rid of variables entirely and replace them with inline values and their monikers.

How Does Inversion of Control Really Work?

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IoC seems to have become the cornerstone concept of many frameworks and object-oriented designs since it was described by Martin Fowler, Robert Martin and others ten years ago. Despite its popularity IoC is misunderstood and overcomplicated all too often.

A Remote Slave Is Still a Slave

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Working remotely is definitely a trend, according to the BLS and my personal observations. "Let them work from home" seems to be the silver bullet for every second startup and even some big companies like Buffer, Automattic, Groove, and many others. However, in most cases, the replacement of a brick-and-mortar office with a virtual one doesn't help companies and their slaves employees become more productive.

SixNines.io, Your Website Availability Monitor

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Availability is a metric that demonstrates how often your website is available to its users. Technically, it's a ratio between the number of successful attempts to open the website and the number of failed ones. If one out of a hundred attempts failed, we can say the availability is 99 percent. High-quality websites aim for so-called "six nines" high availability, so named by the number of 9s in the ratio: 99.9999 percent. We created a service that helps you measure this metric and demonstrate its value to your users: SixNines.

Why I Won't Help You Via Email

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I've been blogging and writing for almost three years now, and a few times a week I get emails or Facebook and Telegram messages from people I don't really know. They ask questions about Java, management, object-oriented programming, and other things they believe I understand and can help them with. Well, my contact details are published right in the header on my blog—what else would I expect, right? True, but even though I always reply to them, I never answer their questions.

Flexibility Equates to Lower Quality

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There are two opposing mindsets: "If it works, it's good" vs. "If it's good, it works;" or "Make it work" vs. "Make it right." I'm talking about the software source code. I've been hearing this almost every day in blog comments: Why do we need all those new OOP principles if our code works just fine without them? What is the point of introducing a new way, which is supposed to be "better," if the existing, traditional, semi-object, semi-procedural, not-so-perfect approach just works?

PDD in Action

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Puzzle-driven development (PDD) is a methodology we've been practicing on our teams for more than seven years. Using PDD, we delegate the responsibility of task decomposition to its performers, eliminating the role of a project manager. We've been using our proprietary software for that. A month ago, we made it public, open source, and free. It is available as 0pdd—a GitHub-based chat bot.