Why I Don't Talk to Google Recruiters

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This is a real story, and it's not only about Google. I'm getting emails from recruiters at Amazon, Facebook, and smaller Silicon Valley startups. They find me somehow, most likely through this blog, my books, or my GitHub account. They always start with "We're so impressed by your profile" and finish with "Let's schedule an interview." I always reply with the same text, and they always disappear, only to come back in a few months under a different name. Let me explain my reasons; maybe you will do the same and we can change this situation in the industry.

StackOverflow Is Your Mandatory Tool

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I've said before that your StackOverflow reputation is very important to us when we make a decision on how much we should pay a software developer. However, there were many complaints about this metric. Take, for example, the ones here and here. In a nutshell, so many of you disagreed and said that the number of StackOverflow up-votes was nothing more than a measurement of the amount of time someone spent answering stupid questions asked by clueless programmers. Let me disagree and explain why your activity on this platform is so important to your career.

Each Private Static Method Is a Candidate for a New Class

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Do you have private static methods that help you break your algorithms down into smaller parts? I do. Every time I write a new method, I realize that it can be a new class instead. Of course, I don't make classes out of all of them, but that has to be the goal. Private static methods are not reusable, while classes are—that is the main difference between them, and it is crucial.

Decorating Envelopes

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Sometimes Very often I need a class that implements an interface by making an instance of another class. Sound weird? Let me show you an example. There are many classes of that kind in the Takes Framework, and they all are named like *Wrap. It's a convenient design concept that, unfortunately, looks rather verbose in Java. It would be great to have something shorter, like in EO for example.

16 Don'ts of Career Growth

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I get questions like this all the time: How does one become a senior software developer or an architect? How does one grow from a junior just starting to write Java code to the leader of a software team that is driving a BMW and making $150K+ per year? What are the exact steps that won't waste time and will get you there faster? Let me share what I think might be helpful.

Synchronized Decorators to Replace Thread-Safe Classes

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You know what thread safety is, right? If not, there is a simple example below. All classes must be thread-safe, right? Not really. Some of them have to be thread-safe? Wrong again. I think none of them have to be thread-safe, while all of them have to provide synchronized decorators.

How to Teach a Customer

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In outsourcing, very often a customer is an idiot doesn't really know what he needs—not only in terms of functionality, but also on a technical level. What makes the situation even worse is that the customer very often always thinks he knows and understands enough. The question is how do you teach a customer? How do you train, educate, and help him? You don't!

How Much Do You Love Conflict?

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Conflict is what progress is made of. A professional and well-managed team loves conflicts and creates them on a daily basis. A professional project manager provokes conflicts and makes sure none of them end in a consensus. Does that sound strange? It's not sarcasm. Read on.

Can Objects Be Friends?

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As discussed before, proper encapsulation leads to a complete absence of "naked data." However, the question remains: How can objects interact if they can't exchange data? Eventually we have to expose some data in order to let other objects use it, right? Yes, that's true. However, I guess I have a solution that keeps encapsulation in place while allowing objects to interact.

MVC vs. OOP

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Model-View-Controller (MVC) is an architectural pattern we all are well aware of. It's a de-facto standard for almost all UI and Web frameworks. It is convenient and easy to use. It is simple and effective. It is a great concept ... for a procedural programmer. If your software is object-oriented, you should dislike MVC as much as I do. Here is why.