Pimp Up Your Resume

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There are tons of articles about resume writing. Literally, tons of them. And here's yet another one? Well, maybe ... but I don't think so. I'll try to give you a few practical hints for how to make your resume look "sexier", and how to position yourself beyond the "good programmer" category and into the superstar zone. It may take a few years to truly pimp up your CV, but when it's done, you will charge $100-plus per hour and face no hesitation from your clients in paying.

How We Interview Programmers

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At Teamed.io, we've been getting about 10 resumes every day from programmers who want to work with us. We don't do video or online coding interviews. We don't ask you to solve any puzzles or demonstrate your algorithm-writing abilities. Moreover, when we decide not to hire you, we honestly and openly explain why. And we almost never offend anyone. So how exactly does it work? There are a few basic principles I would like to share.

Holacracy or Autocracy? Both!

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I strongly believe that while it is very effective to structure an organization in a democratic and sociocratic way, a project should be managed completely different. A project should resemble a dictatorship, authoritarian or military hierarchy with a single strong, result-oriented leader who gives explicit orders that are never doubted by subordinates and an explicitly defined hierarchy.

Are You Still Debugging?

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Debugging is "a process of running a program/method interactively, breaking execution flow after each statement and showing..." In a nutshell, it is a very useful technique ... for a bad programmer. Or an old programmer who is still writing procedural code in C. Object-oriented programmers never debug their code—they write unit tests. My point here is that unit testing is a technique that completely replaces debugging. If debugging is required, the design is bad.

Design Patterns and Anti-Patterns, Love and Hate

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Design Patterns are ... Come on, you know what they are. They are something we love and hate. We love them because they let us write code without thinking. We hate them when we see the code of someone who is used to writing code without thinking. Am I wrong? Now, let me try to go through all of them and show you how much I love or hate each one. Follow me, in alphabetic order.

Defensive Programming via Validating Decorators

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Do you check the input parameters of your methods for validity? I don't. I used to, but not anymore. I just let my methods crash with a null pointer and other exceptions when parameters are not valid. This may sound illogical, but only in the beginning. I'm suggesting you use validating decorators instead.

How Expensive Is Your Outsourcing Team?

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Let me put it this way: $15 per hour for a senior Java developer—is that cheap or expensive? It's cheap, right? Right. What would you say if I told you this cheap Java developer hardly writes two primitive lines of code per day? You're paying $600 every week but rarely getting anything back. How cheap is this Java guy now? My point is that using hourly rate as a cost indicator is a very bad idea, whether with outsourcing or in-house teams.

Good Programmers Don't Work for Equity

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"You're a good programmer. I'm a great entrepreneur. This is a breakthrough idea. Help me build it. I don't have cash, but I will give you equity. Deal?" I hear this at least once a month, and I always say no. Not because I don't like your idea. Indeed, it is really interesting. And not because I'm too busy. I would definitely find time for a good idea. It's not that. I say no because I don't think you're a good entrepreneur.

How Do You Punish Your Employees?

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Punishment ... how do you prefer to do it? There are many ways to punish employees; some are rather effective, while others simply don't work. This is not an exact science. Actually, I would say it's an art. You must be creative, innovative, and very open-minded. You never know which method of punishment will work with whom. Some people respond to one method, while others may completely ignore it. The overarching goal, of course, is to make employees scared of you, their boss, so they will obey enthusiastically. Here is a list of the most effective methods :)

Employee Turnover Is Good for the Maintainability of Your Code Base

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This is what Wikipedia says about this: "High turnover may be harmful to a company's productivity if skilled workers are often leaving, and the worker population contains a high percentage of novices." I agree. However, I believe that low turnover may also be very harmful.